Camping and cave paintings in the Dordogne.

The Dordogne has plenty of attractions, beautiful countryside and great weather.  But for those interested in art and history it has  prehistoric sites, relics and cave paintings.

The  works of art, were often found by accident,  in one case three boys rescued their dog that had fallen down a hole and saw to their amazement two huge panels of animals carved in relief in stone. They vowed to tell no one of their discovery as long as they lived, but the promise lasted just 4 hours before they couldn’t resist telling their teacher all about their adventure!

One of the most famous caves is Lascaux, where palaeolithic cave paintings were discovered. Unfortunately the original cave can no longer be visited as it was discovered that  opening it to the public caused damage to the paintings.

As a result the French have reconstructed the cave, complete with copies of the famous painting, where visitors can enjoy what is a similar atmosphere to that of the original.

We love the Dordogne, lovely food, so many interesting towns and things to see. The French campsites are always a joy and there is plenty of room for motorhomes and tents.

La Roque-Gageac is a beautiful place, set below cliffs on the river Dordogne, it that caters for canoers,  offers boat trips as well as having a row of very reasonable  restaurants, a weekly market and a garden walk through a huge range of oriental plants.

Above my attempt at a pastel near the garden.

              

Two of my favourite photos., I love the reflection on the left.

Mado and Jean very dear friends, they have a farm near Toulouse and came up to join us for a couple of days.

 

More of La Roque-Gageac and

an example of the prehistoric carvings.

This entry was posted in Galleries and Art in widest sense, Photography and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Camping and cave paintings in the Dordogne.

  1. David says:

    Glad you like Dordogne.
    It’s definitely one of the most beautiful and interesting part of France

    Like

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