Frosty the Snowman – Happy Christmas

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If you were a child in the 50s and one of your parents worked for a big company chances are you would be invited to the company’s annual party.

Some of our early performances with our marionettes included works parties. Kelloggs (the people who make the cornflakes) was one of the early ones.  Children would get a tea, an entertainment and, if they were lucky, might get a toy and an orange to take home.

The whole show took place in a portable theatre with red velvet and gold curtains that had to be set up at each location in the space of an hour. 1-DSCF1965-001The puppets had to be unpacked and untangled. Charlie and Nicky the clown were a double act.

I recently found the soundtrack to the latter their repartee was fundamental to the success of the show. I still hope to add to a film later this year. But Frosty was always popular at Christmas.

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After the show the theatre was dismantled. the marionettes packed into huge laundry baskets and we carried everything out to our Bedford Dormobile.

If you remember these works parties do add your comment!

Later we often entertained the children of famous people, Princess Alexandra, Peter Sellers etc. These parties were usually at places like the Dorchester Hotel in London but sometimes in our clients’ own homes.   We were often invited to join in with the rest of the party.

The following is Frosty in retirement!

Even as a young child I was often expected to help with the show. I guess that’s why I write poems about that time and sometimes try to re-construct and film scenes from our shows.

It was easier when we changed to Cabaret Puppets and could be part of a Panto or a Variety Show.

Written while waiting Father Christmas, of course!

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This entry was posted in Ann's memoir, Brighton - out and about, Cheer yourself up on a dull day, Christmas - love or loath it?, Marionette, Photography, Retiring to Brighton - ups and downs and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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